Where’s Your Flying Car? Still Years From Reality


Curtiss Autoplane. Fulton Airphibian. Taylor Aerocar.

Businesses and entrepreneurs have been promising a mass-produced flying automobile for greater than a century. None have succeeded, however that hasn’t stopped Hyundai and Uber from wanting in on the motion.

In Las Vegas on Monday, on the Consumer Electronics Show, the 2 corporations introduced that they have been becoming a member of forces to develop an all-electric air taxi that may be a part of a future “aerial ride-share network.”

“We’re looking at the dawn of a completely new era that opens the skies above our cities,” Jaiwon Shin, the top of Hyundai’s Urban Air Mobility division, mentioned on the announcement. “We will be able to fly on demand — just imagine that.”

The South Korean automaker confirmed a small-scale mannequin on Monday and provided a virtual-reality expertise. A nonfunctioning full-scale mannequin was in a while show.

But a number of challenges await. Building an air taxi that is quiet, safe and economical will mean overcoming several engineering and technical hurdles. Battery technology is limited, and the cost of operation and maintenance needs to be low enough to make rides commercially viable.

And then there is a long road to regulatory approval. According to Morgan Stanley, air taxis will probably be used first in package delivery, which has fewer technical and regulatory barriers.

In its Monday announcement, Hyundai said it would be able to bring “automotive-scale manufacturing” to Uber Elevate, the company’s aerial ride-hailing division. Hyundai would help produce and deploy the aircraft while Uber would handle support, ground connections and the customer interface.

Hyundai’s concept car, the S-A1, is designed to cruise 1,000 to 2,000 feet above the ground at 180 miles per hour. It would take trips up to 60 miles and seat four passengers and a pilot, though the aircraft would eventually be capable of autonomous flight.

During peak hours, the S-A1 would take about five to seven minutes to recharge, Hyundai said. Multiple rotors would allow for vertical takeoff and landing and be quieter than large-rotor helicopters with combustion engines — a feature critical to its use in cities, according to the company.

Uber has said it plans to host flight demonstrations this year and make its service commercially available in 2023. In addition to Hyundai, its partners include the Boeing subsidiary Aurora Flight Sciences, Bell, Embraer, Joby Aviation and several real estate companies. It has also signed agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop ideas related to the infrastructure and technology of a crewless aerial network.



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